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The 'Objectives' section in a CV

Commonly used, especially for adding value to applications for positions, the 'Objectives' section is part of the options in the process of writing a CV.

Some choose to use it, others do not. Some recruiters attach importance to it, and others do not. A small point on the 'Objectives' section in a CV and how to incorporate it.

The 'Objectives' section in a CV: what is it, and what is it for?

Located at the top of the CV, usually next to your photo and personal information, the 'Objective' section of a CV consists of a sentence or two and relates to your ultimate objective, the one that pushed you to send your application to the recruiter concerned.

Clearly, the 'Objectives' section is to the CV what the subject line is to a letter. Located at the top of the CV, usually next to your photo and personal information, the 'Objective' section of a CV consists of a sentence or two and relates to your ultimate objective, the one that pushed you to send your application to the recruiter concerned. Clearly, the 'Objectives' section is to the CV what the subject line is to a letter.

The 'Objectives' section can serve two purposes:

  • You have sent an unsolicited application, and in this case, it may be important to specify for which position you are applying.

  • You have applied for a competitive position and would like to demonstrate to the recruiter that you have understood the specific issues of the position and the related responsibilities.

The 'Objectives' section is often used to show that you have a good grasp of the job position for which you are applying, and that you feel capable of taking on the duties and responsibilities that lie ahead.

It is also very useful when your basic training, or your professional experience does not quite fit the desired profile, but you still feel that you have the prerequisites for the job by highlighting your skills and abilities with your experience or training. The 'Objectives' section makes your intentions clear.

In concrete terms, you present your profile in a few words: education and training, experience and qualifications, and show how they correspond directly to the attributes sought for the job and what you intend to do.

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The 'Objective' section in a CV: examples

If you are a metalworking industry professional: Have a beginner position in the metalworking industry where I can use my machining skills effectively and at the same time gain a comprehensive understanding of metallurgy techniques with a global perspective.

If you apply as a territorial attaché in the children's entertainment sector: Following a first job in the publishing sector, I would like to express my skills at the service of the community in the framework of an innovative and social project.

The 'Objective' in a CV: what to do and not to do

The details to respect scrupulously:

  • your objective must be fully in line with the implications of the post concerned;

  • be clear and direct: you do not have to go off on tangents while explaining what you understood the job to be, you are in a hurry to find a new job, and the recruiter is in a hurry to recruit, do not waste time, and do not let the recruiter waste it;

  • link your objective to your professional history as far as possible, this will demonstrate a logical thread that will appeal even more to the recruiter and eventually convince him / her to grant you an interview;

  • as part of a creative job application - and only with this condition!-, do not hesitate to distil a small dose of originality to show your personal style and your writing, infographics, or musical abilities...

What not to do:

  • don't make questionable jokes; unless you are applying for a humorous post, leave them out.

  • overly technical terms: this could hide that you have not really mastered the stakes of the job.